Spreeder CX can import and accurately convert files with the following extensions.
Now you can speed read content from 46 file types!

  • abw
  • doc
  • docx
  • html
  • lwp
  • md
  • odt
  • pages
  • pages.zip
  • pdf
  • rst
  • rtf
  • sdw
  • tex
  • wpd
  • wps
  • zabw
  • cbc
  • cbr
  • cbz
  • chm
  • epub
  • fb2
  • htm
  • htmlz
  • lit
  • lrf
  • mobi
  • pdb
  • pml
  • prc
  • rb
  • snb
  • tcr
  • txtz
  • key
  • key.zip
  • odp
  • pps
  • ppsx
  • ppt
  • pptm
  • pptx
  • ps
  • sda
  • txt
The free app provides a fast and convenient way to read online material as 2-3x your normal speed. Spreeder CX takes this a step further by providing amazing apps for windows/mac/iPad/iPhone, a cloud library to save all your material, bookmarks, more advanced reading options, and training. This all means faster reading, easier learning, and more convenience. You can go here for more info on Spreeder CX or go here to use the free app.
Spreeder CX provides the world’s most powerful “speed e-reading” experience on all your devices. It’s ideal if you want to load in e-books, websites, and other material and read it all quickly using our revolutionary RSVP technology. Spreeder CX also includes some guided training. 7 Speed Reading is focused on providing the world’s most powerful speed reading training system. It includes training courses from 6 world-leading speed-reading experts - the same people who charge thousands to teach fortune 100 companies to speed read. It also includes comprehension tracking and improvement and 15 brain games to make you a superlearner. NOTE: there is currently a special offer where Spreeder CX is being included for free when you get 7 Speed Reading. Click here for more information.
Spreeder CX and 7 Speed Reading work with all languages that read left to right, top to bottom.
All products are appropriate for ages ten and above.
You can directly import pdf, word, html, and text. You can also easily copy and paste almost any other format directly into Spreeder CX or 7 Speed Reading.
Both Spreeder CX and 7 Speed Reading aim to double or triple your reading speed within 2 weeks. To do this we recommend using the software for 5-10 minutes per day.
Spreeder CX and 7 Speed Reading increase your reading speed using a number of proven methods. These involve removing bad habits such as subvocalization (saying the words in you head), regression (unnecessarily stopping and re-reading), and limited fixation (reading only a single word at a time). 7 Speed Reading also shows you many methods to lean faster, read on traditional paper, and more.

The Blog

Spreeder Pro for iPhone – Your Questions Answered

Since we announced the release of Spreeder Pro for iPhone, the response has been unprecedented. Tens of thousands of iOS users have visited our website, answered our survey, or contacted our helpdesk. In this blog post we answer your most common questions about Spreeder Pro for iPhone.

We truly believe this is the most important thing we have ever done to realize our vision of changing lives by changing the way people read. We are very excited to be bringing your Spreeder Pro iPhone soon!

NOTE: If you have not completed the Spreeder Pro iPhone survey, we’d REALLY appreciate it if you could click here and do it now. It only takes 20 seconds and we’re checking every response before we go live.

If I start reading on my iPad or laptop, can I continue where I left off on my iPhone?

Yes you can. That is exactly the idea. Your cloud library and reading is wherever you are, whenever you need it, whether that be on your desktop, iPad, laptop or iPhone. Spreeder remembers and syncs the position in every book you’re reading across all your devices.

I already have Spreeder Pro on iPad and desktop; will I automatically be given access to the iPhone version too?

Absolutely! We stand by our customers and we’d never charge you more to access a new platform. All existing Spreeder Pro customers will be given access to the iPhone version at no additional cost.

What if I’m not yet a Spreeder Pro customer?

If you’re not yet a Spreeder Pro customer, please don’t buy Spreeder Pro yet. We’ll be doing a launch special offer with a huge discount to celebrate the iPhone release. Stay tuned for more information.

How flexible is the speed e-reader?

The famous Spreed (speed e-reading) function is better than ever on the iPhone. It has powerful settings so you can make it match you reading style. You can adjust the number of words, number of lines, fonts, and advanced settings. There is configurable punctuation pausing and much more. You can stream text a word at a time, multiple words, and do manual reading. It all means you can read more material and comprehend and learn and much higher rates.


How much time can I save by using Spreeder?

If you read a lot, you can save 5-7 hours per week and possibly a lot more. Many Spreeder users are reading at 3-4 time their normal Speed. This allows you to stay on top of all your reading, learn more, boost your career, be knowledgeable and interesting, and much more.


Will the iPhone version have step-by-step training to eliminate bad reading habits?

Yes, there will be step by step training to address your bad reading habits like subvocalization, regressing (unnecessary rereading), and single word fixations.


Does it support my language?

Spreeder Pro supports all languages that read left to right, top to bottom.

Are the expert training courses available on the iPhone?

Yes, all the expert training courses are available on the iPhone. Your course progress is synced across devices. So you can start training on your laptop or iPad at home, then continue on your iPhone on your commute.


Can I use it to read web pages?

Yes it’s easy to speed read web pages with Spreeder iPhone. You can enter a URL and the intelligent software will automatically extract the readable text (i.e. it removes menus, ads, and other unwanted elements). Alternatively, you can go to a webpage and simply highlight the text you want to speed read. This function is great for absorbing and learning large amounts of material online easily.


Does it come with e-books?

Yes. Your Spreeder cloud library comes pre-loaded with over 20,000 ebooks and you have full access to these on your iPhone. This include business books, self help, history, arts, religion, news, and much more.


Does this work on Android phones and tablets?

Not yet. We have plans to release an Android version later this year. All users of Spreeder pro will automatically get access to the Android version at no extra cost when it’s released.

Is an Internet connection required to use Spreeder iPhone?

An Internet connection is not required to continue speed reading your current book or text. However, you’ll need a connection to change books or access the training courses.

I can’t wait! When will Spreeder Pro iPhone be released?

We are working hard to add the final touches right now. We expect it to be released before the end of April. Stay tuned for more information.

Seven Sets of Words to Use, Not Confuse

Because many word pairs in English are homophones (words that sound alike), some mistakes that people make when speaking aren’t noticeable to others. For example, if we were to tell you that today its cold outside or our dog lost it’s collar yesterday you wouldn’t know that we had used the wrong version of its / it’s in those two phrases. However, if we had written those phrases in a letter or e-mail, you would have noticed right away, and would probably have started doubting that we really know what we’re talking about when it comes to English vocabulary, if we made such an obvious mistake! There are many pairs of words in English that are often confused due to their pronunciation, their spelling, or both. If you’re one of the many people who are confused by them, you’re at risk of seeming less knowledgeable when you make those mistakes. Here are seven word pairs to learn – correctly – by heart:

forward / foreword

Moving forward means “moving ahead.” A moving foreword is a preface or introduction to a book that causes an emotional reaction. We’re giving you the extra word pair here of two definitions of the word moving as well.

averse / adverse

If you really don’t want to dye your hair blue, it might be because you’re averse to making such a radical change in your appearance; that is, you’re unwilling to dye your hair. You might also be reluctant to do it because it would have an adverse (negative, detrimental) effect on your chances of a promotion at work.

counsel / council

We would counsel (advise, suggest) that you take some time to study the local ordinances before running for a seat on the town council (a group of people elected as administrators).

advise / advice

In the previous sentence, we gave you a piece of advice. The verb to advise means to counsel someone, or to share your knowledge to help another person. The noun advice describes what it is you’ve told that person.

discreet / discrete

If you’re advising someone on a sensitive issue, you should be discreet (subtle, cautious, unobtrusive). The word discrete, which is pronounced the same way, means “separate, individual, not connected.”

inflammable / flammable

Unlike the other word pairs in this post, these two adjectives both mean “able to be burned.” The adjective nonflammable is the one to use when you want to describe something that can’t be burned.

viscous / vicious

These two words are frequently misspelled and mispronounced. The adjective viscous (pronounced VIHS-cuss) describes a sticky, thick liquid, like glue or honey. The adjective vicious (pronounced VIH-shuhs) means fierce, angry, or cruel.

Stick with your daily vocabulary study and you’ll keep moving forward towards your goal of English vocabulary improvement!

Vocab1 guarantees to help you increase your vocabulary knowledge! Learn more words and apply them in your writings.

How Improving Your Touch Typing Skills Will Help You

Everyone keeps telling you how touch typing will improve your career prospects and give you an edge over other candidates who suffer from sloppy writing filled with typos. But has anyone really explained exactly how touch typing helps you on a practical level? Here’s how:

Productivity boost

Touch typing saves you a lot of time. While other people use the old “hunt and peck” method to write a report, you’re done in half that time and use the spare time to focus on a personal project, negotiating with a potential new big client, or doing some extra work to get that raise.

Touch typing doesn’t only help you finish your work on time, it gives you time to learn new skills, hone existing ones, and of course pursuit new projects and expand your network in beneficial ways.

It’s a health matter

Bad posture and counterproductive keyboard positioning can leave your neck stiff, your shoulders sore, and your wrist joints hurting. Touch typing is not only about typing with lightning speed, it’s also about the correct sitting posture, the correct hand and finger placement, and the ability to use your motor skills effectively so that you won’t have to look down your keyboard every few seconds to find the correct key.

Clear communication, uninterrupted flow

Poor typing habits means your thoughts are interrupted each time you accidentally press the wrong key on your keyboard. Touch typing gives you an advantage in that you get to type as fast as your thoughts pour in. In two words: torrential productivity. With unimpeded typing you are able to focus on your ideas, and spending your time processing and refining them.

Instead of wasting your time proofreading your work for misspellings and typos, you have more time to fine-tune your ideas and present top notch work.

Professional image

Proficient touch typists have a very low rate of typos because apart from typing speed they also have mastered their typing accuracy. Fewer typos means fewer chances of the entire Internet someone finding embarrassing typos, such as the notorious digital typo by Amanda Hess.

Have you been convinced to start learning how to touch type yet?

How to Remove DRM from Kindle Books by Pluto Pavlov

Everyone is asking “How can we read Kindle Books to an e-reading device especially with speed reading capability software?”

Well, we should worry no more! Pluto Pavlov has created a video tutorial that might help everyone with the dilemma.

1) Watch YouTube video “How to Remove DRM from Kindle Books” by Pluto Pavlov, published 1/1/2014.

2) Download and install calibre ebook management software from calibre-ebook.com/download

3) Download and install DeDRM Tools 6.5.2 from https://apprenticealf.wordpress.com/2016/10/11/dedrm-tools-6-5-2-released/. Apprentice Alf’s Blog contains several useful posts.

4) Follow directions on YouTube video above to install DeDRM plugin for calibre.

5) Follow directions on YouTube video to drag and drop Kindle ebook into calibre. This will automatically remove DRM from the Kindle ebook.

6) Convert the Kindle ebook to EPUB format. In Page Setup, set Input Format as “Kindle” and Output Format as “iPad”, but other settings may work as well.

The Benefits of Using the Best Speed Reading Software (Guest Post)

Speed reading software teaches people to read articles and documents quickly, and helps them learn how to instantly scan and comprehend text line by line instead of word by word. The best speed reading software teaches this important technique, and such software will also have other benefits. For example, the best speed reading software is easy to use, and so can be used by anyone regardless of their age or educational background. For instance, a post graduate student can use it and get good results, and a high school student can also use it for their learning needs. Another benefit the best software provides is that the user is able to access the application from any computer; they can learn anywhere, at any time, as long as they have a computer or laptop.

The most obvious benefit of the best speed reading software is that it increases the user’s reading speed when they use it. A person can increase their reading speed by up to three times each week by regular practice. The more times a person uses the application the more they increase their reading speed. The best reading speed software is also has easy to follow instructions, enabling the user to adjust a wide range of parameters to suit their own learning style. The user can also reinforce all the techniques that are important for becoming an efficient reader. A speed reader is able to do a lot of reading faster and so will enjoy the reading process.

The best speed reading software is a learning tool and combines both physical and physiological methods. These methods should be supported by empirical evidence attesting to the fact that they work, and that the exercises have practical utility. Another major benefit from the best speed reading software is that it provides additional exercises after each reading lesson that keep the user’s brain in good overall shape. The exercise enables the user to learn to think and answer based on the reading done previously. The exercises are useful as they help to practise for exams or interviews, giving the user the experience of how to answer questions based on previous study. The best speed reading software also offers a range of exercises that are based on the readings made in the chapter or unit.

The best speed reading software promotes learning by providing instantaneous feedback. The reason this is important is because the user can examine if they have benefited or learnt something from the reading exercises just completed. The more questions in the exercises the user can answer the more they understand or comprehend the reading. The reading speed of the user is also another feedback point, showing how it increases or improves with time. Good speed reading software allows the users to comment on how much knowledge they have gained. The best speed reading software also has many tracking tools and reports that are useful and accurate. This provides proof of the credibility of the speed reading software.

The best speed reading software also has interactive games and learning tasks for the students. The games and learning tasks help the students to take a break from the more intensive reading exercises, and enhances their memory and understanding of the reading material in fun ways. They engage the students and encourage them to participate in the games and learning tasks, thus enabling learning to continue despite the break. Games are useful as students love games and also play them willingly. Therefore, offering users the opportunity to engage in games and learning tasks as they read enable them to improve their reading, as they are eager to find more games. The users can also enjoy stories that are present in the software. The best software will provide stories that are based on a wide variety of topics.

The best speed reading software also provides a wide range of programs that are designed professionally. These programs are calibrated in order to meet the needs of the individual and groups using the software. The user is also able to pursue a curriculum that is structured, focused and designed by the user on their own.

Anyone can benefit from the best speed reading software as it improves comprehension and understanding of the reading. This is because such a software product has interactive games, stories, exercises and learning tasks that aid in understanding as they provide a practical example to the theory discussed. It also helps the users to train their eyes and brains from one step to another. The best speed reading software also provides results that are guaranteed. The software is parent-friendly and customizable thus can be adjusted to meet the needs of the user.

Cross-posted on the 7 Speed Reading blog.

The Single Most Important Rule For Double Letters

There are many words in English that differ by only one letter, and when it’s the same letter repeated, it’s easy to get confused. However, English pronunciation comes to the rescue to help with English spelling rules, and there’s an easy way to tell the difference between words that have a single letter and words that have a doubled letter: the sound of the vowel. Learning the pronunciation of a word helps you know which to use to get the word you want.

Take a look at these word pairs and their pronunciations:

scraping / scrapping
(SKRAY-ping / SKRAH-ping)

waging / wagging
(WAY-jing / WAH-ging)

hoping / hopping
(HOH-ping / HAW-ping)

doting / dotting
(DOH-ting / DAW-ting)

diner / dinner
(DAI-nuhr / DIH-nuhr)

caped / capped

In each of the pairs, the first word is pronounced with a “long” vowel sound in the first syllable – that is, it has the sound of the letter itself: a = AY, i = AI, o = OH.

In the second words of each pair, the doubled consonant has changed the vowel from a “long” vowel sound to a “short” vowel sound: a = AH, i = IH, o = AW.

Note: In today’s post we focused on single and double consonants, but there are also ways to use pronunciation to help with doubled vowels. We’ll look at those in another post.

GRE Reading Comprehension Practice

Taking and passing the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) is a requirement to get into most advanced university programs in English-speaking countries. Students who are pursuing a doctorate in their field will need to take the GRE General Test, and may also be required to take one of the GRE Subject Tests. In these exams, students are required to show their ability to read and analyze texts in the reading comprehension section.

Good reading comprehension is based on having a good vocabulary. Obviously, if the text you’re asked to analyze contains one or more words that you don’t know, you’ll find it harder to accurately discuss the meaning and content of the text. We’ve found a passage from H. G. Wells’ “The Outline of History” that’s related to vocabulary. Read the text, then answer the questions we’ve provided, which are modeled on questions you’ll encounter in the GRE.

It is improbable that there was ever such a thing as a common human language. We know nothing of the language of Paleolithic man; we do not even know whether Paleolithic man talked freely. We know that Paleolithic man had a keen sense of form and attitude, because of his drawings; and it has been suggested that he communicated his ideas very largely by gesture. Probably such words as the earlier men used were mainly cries of alarm or passion or names for concrete things, and in many cases they were probably imitative sounds made by or associated with the things named. The first languages were probably small collections of such words; they consisted of interjections and nouns. Probably the nouns were said in different intonations to convey different meanings. If Paleolithic man had a word for “horse” or “bear,” he probably showed by tone or gesture whether he meant “bear is coming,” “bear is going,” “bear is to be hunted,” “dead bear,” “bear has been here,” “bear did this,” and so on. Only very slowly did the human mind develop methods of indicating action and relationship in a formal manner. Modern languages contain many thousands of words, but the earlier languages could have consisted only of a few hundred. It is said that even modern European peasants can get along with something less than a thousand words, and it is quite conceivable that so late as the Early Neolithic Period that was the limit of the available vocabulary. Probably men did not indulge in those days in conversation or description. For narrative purposes they danced and acted rather than told. They had no method of counting beyond a method of indicating two by a dual number, and some way of expressing many. The growth of speech was at first a very slow process indeed, and grammatical forms and the expression of abstract ideas may have come very late in human history, perhaps only 400 or 500 generations ago.

Question 1: According to Wells, is a large vocabulary necessary for communication?

Question 2: How does Wells imagine Paleolithic man communicating the difference between the phrases “bear is coming” and “bear is going”?

Question 3: What is the main difference that Wells finds between modern language and the earliest forms of language?

7 Proven Practices to Avoid Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a major concern for millions of people who type during a large part of their workday. Web programmers, writers, data analysts, and many other office workers, scientists, and professionals will experience some discomfort in their hands and wrist after repetitive motions.

Even if you don’t type constantly, things like swimming, tennis, and weight lifting can cause CTS as well.

You can, however, avoid carpal tunnel syndrome by following these preventive practices.

Practice common sense

If you’re in a profession that makes you prone to CTS consider taking measures that will prevent this from happening to you. Any job where you use your hands and wrists extensively puts them at risk. Make sure you rest your hands and body enough and strengthen your wrists to avoid damaging them.

Optimize your workstation

It may be the job of your employer to make sure that you have a workstation that helps to prevent CTS and other repetitive stress injuries.

If this is not the case, take the matter into your own hands. Use ergonomic equipment like a keyboard pad, and take frequent breaks from repetitive work that puts your wrists and shoulders under a lot of stress.

Take care of yourself

Exercise and strengthen your hands and wrists in a way that doesn’t contribute to deterioration, but helps keep it at bay instead. The key thing to remember is that you’re looking for ways to exercise that avoid any extremes.

Being in overall good health will ensure you keep CTS at bay, and helps you to take prompt action when symptoms kick in.

Improve your posture

If you exercise regularly, it will help improve your posture, which is an essential aspect of successful CTS prevention. Are you following the experts’ recommendations for good posture when typing.

1) Your spine should rest against your chair along your mid-back.

2) Your shoulders and elbows should stay in a relaxed position.

3) Your wrists should remain in a horizontal position.

4) Your feet should either be on a footrest, or firmly touching the ground with the back of your knees forming a 90 degree angle.

5) Your screen should be at eye level to avoid strain on your neck and extra stress on your wrists and hands.

6) Your wrist should be lightly supported by a keyboard pad, but not rest heavily against it. Do not rest your wrists on the edge of your laptop.

Following all of these steps will help ensure that you minimize your risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome.

Follow Typesy on Facebook, Twitter and Googe+ for more tips and advice.

Check out eReflect’s Profile on Wikipedia, Youtube, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Crunchbase and Training Industry as well!

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Speed Reading And Peter Sandeen’s Time-Saving Marketing Strategies

When you’re trying to grow your business, you’re constantly fighting against the clock. There are never enough hours in the day to do everything. Customers and clients expect you to be on call 24/7 and you’ve got to fit that into your schedule along with everything else. And both society and technology keep moving forward, which means that you have to keep up with trends, stay on top of breaking news, and make sure you’re ahead of the competition. In order to do that, you need the best information you can get, from as many sources as possible – and you need the ability to read, remember, and recall that information so that you can use it at precisely the right moment. That’s one of the reasons we encourage people to learn to speed read. When you have that extra time, you’ll be able to devote it to learning from people like Peter Sandeen, whose expert advice on marketing can help you expand your client list and communicate with your customers to keep your business booming. We asked him about his strategies for information overload and other time-saving tips.

7SR: You’re an articulate writer, and you frequently emphasize the importance of well-crafted professional text in written communication with customers. Is writing a skill that people should spend the time developing, or can they “outsource” that particular task?

Peter Sandeen: If you write for a business, the purpose is to make the reader get closer to buying what you sell. Understanding what are the best reasons for them to choose your products and services is more important than literary ingenuity.

First, of course, you need to know what those reasons are—what I call your value proposition—so you can convey them with your writing.

When you have a clear value proposition, developing your writing skills makes perfect sense. But you should devote your studies to copywriting. Writing with the explicit purpose to “convert” is very different from casual writing. Much of the general writing advice just won’t have the same impact on your results that better copywriting skills could have.

7SR: There’s a lot of information out there on marketing strategies, not to mention all of the articles and news feeds that are directly related to a person’s field, service, or product. What do you recommend to people when they tell you they’re unable to keep up with reading all of that material?

Peter: Information overload is a very common reason for people to slow down their progress. They might actually do a lot of things. But they’re not focused on taking consistent steps on the shortest road to their goals, but instead they spread their efforts over countless projects, so they don’t make much progress at all.

Focus your information intake on a small select group of sources. And avoid learning from conflicting sources—people look at marketing in so many different ways that you might be dragged to completely different directions by different people’s advice. Preferably find just one or two sources you trust and understand, so you can actually act on the advice.

7SR: Where should a new business owner begin? Should they be working on self-improvement that will polish professional credentials or personal skills, or focusing on getting a website up and running and starting to look for sales right away?

Peter: Maybe you’re fine with first studying marketing for a few years before setting up your first website.

But you won’t learn marketing from a book, blog, or course if you don’t put the ideas into action. So, set up something simple soon. And then improve over time.

Getting started might seem daunting, but once you’re off square one, you can learn much faster.

7SR: Even though professional communication is so important, it’s such a basic part of everyday life that some people may treat business e-mails in the same way they do a quick text to a friend – in other words, without worrying too much about spelling and grammar. How much of a problem do you think this is in general?

Peter: If I get an email with lots of typos, I feel like the sender didn’t really think that the email was worth putting any effort into. In other words, I don’t feel respected.

Simple grammar mistakes that are clearly mistakes, on the other hand, can make you look plain dumb or uneducated.

I don’t mind the occasional typo or forgetting to follow the most obscure grammar rules. But you should respect the person you’re writing the email to enough to read it through at least once.

7SR: What are three books you’d recommend to people to help them improve their communication skills?

Roy Peter Clark: Writing Tools. You’ll learn specific tools (that are surprisingly practical) for making your writing better.

Sol Stein: Stein on Writing. Another excellent book on improving your writing. Sol Stein is an accomplished editor, which gives him a great perspective on what makes writing better.

Joe Vitale: Buying Trances. A great book that helps you understand some key copywriting lessons. The book isn’t quite the classic some other copywriting books are, but it’s really good (and recommending the same old classics seems like a boring choice).

I’d also love to include some Tony Robbins’s books just because writing effectively is really about understanding people. And that’s about psychology—not grammar 🙂

Read More About Peter Sandeen’s Time-Saving Marketing Strategies At www.PeterSandeen.com

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7 Weird and Funny Ways to Learn a New Language

Think learning a new language is boring? Think again – with these techniques, you can improve your skills while having fun!

Here are seven unorthodox language learning tips from the seasoned writers of Scholar Advisor that might just change your perspective in the language learning process:

Stage a Play

It doesn’t have to be a big production. Remember that the keyword to these tips is fun while learning. Stage a short play for a small audience you think would enjoy.

Of course, the other key point here is to stage a play in a completely different language, preferably the one you’re learning. Make use of the language while having fun in this simple activity.

Go on a Blind Date

One way to meet new people, have fun, and practice a new language all at once is through this unconventional tip.

Go on a blind date with a native speaker and try practicing a few key phrases with them during your date. You can even go to a restaurant and try practicing your basic phrases while ordering.

Cook a Foreign Dish

The important part of this exercise is to cook a dish in which instructions are written in another language. This not only boosts your vocabulary, it also helps acquaint you with basic phrases and instructions.

To avoid any accidents, start out with minor dishes first. You don’t have to be able to cook a grand meal yet, just make sure you get the hang of the language.

Buy Comics

Like children’s books, comics are also fun and easy to read, and can also help you be more familiar with the language you’re learning.

Aside from this, interesting storylines and appealing images won’t make it look like a chore, but more of an engaging exercise that both appeals to your visual senses, and helps you learn faster and better.

Once you’ve gotten the hang of reading, learning the language overall will be much easier.

Explore Your Surroundings

This one is for people who are traveling in another country. To really test whether you’ve learned the language right, head out of your cozy room, and walk the streets.

Ask the locals about facts and places in the area where it might be good to stay and further immerse yourself in the culture. Just make sure you can find your way back later on.

Write Down Your Grocery List

Similar to learning to cook in your language of choice, writing down your grocery list is a simple and engaging way to incorporate the language in your daily life.

In fact, before getting on the recipe itself, you can start with the grocery list first. Build your vocabulary by identifying as many kitchen materials and foodstuff in a foreign language you know. You might be surprised by your progress.

Introduce Yourself

Try this out with a friend, or with a pen pal.

Practice communicating with others in a foreign language by making a full introduction using that language alone. Avoid code switching to your native tongue, but try to sound as natural as possible in your introduction.

Don’t be too stiff. If you’re comfortable enough with the person whom you are sharing to, you can also ask for feedback on how well you used the language.

Learning doesn’t always have to stay in school, especially when it comes to an immersive topic like language. Think outside the box and engage in activities that might seem a bit different from classroom exercises.

Incorporate the language as much as possible in your daily life to make it feel more natural to you.

Author’s Bio: Stacey Marone is a freelance writer and blogger. She is fascinated with traveling, exploring new cultures, languages and people. Her hobby is to gather interesting facts and stories and she gladly shares them with everybody.

Studysuccessful.com Creator, Stefan Knapen, Recommends Efficient Study Habits for Academic Success

College and university life can provide many challenges for students, and it’s always good to have someone around who can give students the hints and effective tips that help them get the most out of their study time and their school years. In fact, the advice that Stefan Knapen provides at his website StudySuccessful.com can be applied to many situations and to people of all ages. After all, learning starts immediately and is a never-ending process! Check out Stefan’s site for answers to your questions about study habits, personal development, modern technology, and more.

7SR: You moved quickly through your university years and are now attending medical school in your early 20s. You must be incredibly busy! How do you fit everything into your schedule?

Haha, yeah things are going pretty fast. Well, what I did in my first couple of years was focussing on setting up a system. What kind of schedule should I use, how much work can I take on, and experimenting with different studying techniques. Probably one of the most interesting concepts I learned was the ‘Parkinson’s Law’, which teaches us that work expands with the amount of time you give it. So by taking up a lot of work, you won’t have a lot of time left to give to it. This results in the need to be highly effective in that work.

Take preparing a presentation for example. I could work hours on creating the perfect powerpoint, preparing all the jokes and practicing the presentation a couple of times beforehand. Now, as I simply did not have that time I needed to find the input which yields the highest results. So I focus on the story, I focus on the core principle. The powerpoint lay-out is not a priority at that point. This is also why starting the night before usually works out ‘fine’ (although it is for stress-reasons definitely not recommended!)

7SR: Here at 7 Speed Reading we encourage students to learn to speed read so that they can get through their research and study projects more quickly. Is this something that you’ve found to be helpful?

In med school I have to read a lot. In keeping up my blog I have to read probably even more. So learning the principles of speed reading helped me definitely. I don’t recommend to always speed read, but if it is a low-density text and there are only a couple of principles to get out of it, speed read your way through it and memorise the concepts later.

7SR: You wrote a free guide on how to build a personal website. Why is it important for people to have an online presence?

First of all: in this day and age it’s really simple. If you don’t own your own domain name somebody else will soon enough.

Second: Anybody who will ever have something to do with you will Google you. Being aware of your online presence and working on it as well can give you easily the ownership of the top 5 results in Google. Now, what do you want your future employer to find when he Googles you. Your own personal website, where your CV is clearly outlined and links to your portfolio? Or that picture where your roommate throws beer over you at that frat party on Facebook?

The free guide is a simple step-by-step instruction on how to create your own personal website. Check it out at StudySuccessful: http://studysuccessful.com/blog-as-student/

7SR: Good study habits are important for success in school, and can be applied even in a person’s later professional life. What are some of the study habits you encourage people to develop?

The best study habit would probably be finding out how you work as a person. Do you learn the most from lectures or from books? Do you like to read text or look at pictures? Do you study better in the morning or in the evening? In your first years these are core concepts to figure out. Find out where you are good at and use that.

7SR: What are three things you would recommend to someone who is starting their first year at university?

Again. Find out how you work. What is your way to do things. Together with that: also find out how social aspects of the University life fit into that, because they have to fit in there. This is the best time to meet new people, to make new connections. Use that. Say yes, become busy and find out how you can flourish! 

Cross-posted on the 7 Speed Reading blog.